Living with Parkinson’s: Not Selling Out, Not Giving In

image of hands reaching out to touch

I’ve been struggling with lots of things recently. My life kind of fell apart for a while last year (I know, we all had our problems) but I’m claiming extra issues. I realised just how bad it had been when I undertook a presentation at a networking group I was in. While researching the information I wanted to discuss, I realised something that shocked even me. I was looking at the various different stressors that occur to people in their life. I realised with not inconsiderable surprise that out of the ten most stressful events you can experience in your life, within twelve months I had encountered seven. I’d completed one of them twice, so you could count eight. For those that aren’t aware of these events, here’s the list.

  • Death of a loved one
  • Separation or divorce
  • Getting married
  • Starting a new job
  • Workplace stressors
  • Financial worries
  • Moving to a new home
  • Chronic illness or injury
  • Retirement
  • Transitioning to adulthood

I didn’t retire, get married or transition to adulthood (some might say I’m still waiting on that one), but I moved house twice. With four children. In a volatile market. That was fun. I certainly have everything else on that list.

image of hands reaching out to touch

I have been floundering for a few  months it’s true. Not properly focused on any one thing and it’s caused me additional stress. However I have come to realise that some things are constant. There it is. My old friend chronic illness. I also realise that writing about this really helps other people. We have received messages from people all  over the world that find solace in knowing they’re not alone. I find it a huge blessing to know that just sitting here writing these words might just help someone out there realise they’re not the only one struggling in all of this.

Because sometimes we all struggle. Some more than others. It may be invisible, it might be more obvious, but it’s there. So many people that know me just see a brazen, loud, confident woman bursting with joie de vivre. They don’t see me crying over nothing, lying awake worrying how I’m going to continue to pay for everything, or that inwardly I’m in fear that really everyone thinks I’m a bit stupid and wasting my time.

Yet I will refocus. I will redouble my efforts and get back on track. I’ve had my lull, my period of hopelessness and it’s time to find me again. Because I’m not one to give in, despite it looking like an incredibly easy path. 

On that note you will notice that we have added a button for a service called Patreon. Yes, it’s a request for support and assistance, but we honestly cannot continue to keep writing and consistently provide content without help. We considered adverts, but want to keep this advertisement free. The reality is that to ensure we can invest the time that Good Moves needs, we also need you. Please consider joining to help us continue in our fight to overcome negativity around this awful thing we call Parkinson’s.

Let’s do this together.

Until next time, Kitty.

First twenty signups will receive a handwritten postcard from Kitty and Emma. Get going now!  🙂  

kitty laughing into camera
Kiity Fitton - usually up to mischief.

Kitty Fitton is a motivational speaker, MC and comedian. She is also a full-time blogger and writer. She is mother to four small people and was very cross to discover she had Parkinson’s Disease.

Find out more at her personal site below. 

emma_k
Emma Kyriacou. Quite good at hitting things.

Emma Kyriacou is a real-life ninja. Taking up Karate to help fight her Parkinson’s Disease, she’s co-founder of Good Moves and is passionate about promoting exercise to improve mobility and neuroplasticity. (Is that a word? It should be.)

Find out more at her personal site below. 

Living With Parkinson’s – Stuff I Find Hard

woman reading a phillip pullman novel in a corner.

Stuff I’ve found hard and things that help.


Just like everyone, I go up and down in life and wellness. Good times come and go. Sometimes I’m doing well, sometimes I’m going through a rough time. I feel like I’m doing well at the moment, yet not that long ago I was feeling like I was approaching rock bottom at a fast pace (or maybe smashing through it to delve new lows).
Everyone has suffering in this world, and I hope everyone can experience at least a bit of joy. Maybe my highs and lows fluctuate more wildly than what is “normal”, or the peaks and troughs are higher and deeper. I really don’t know, and can’t assume what others are dealing with. I do know that when you live with something like Parkinson’s, maintaining a reasonable level of functioning can be a difficult balancing act.
Here’s a list of some things that I find challenging and stuff that has helped me deal with it:
1. Challenge number one for me is to stop losing weight. Yes, I got the message about exercise, and maybe I overtrained a bit (I honestly don’t have a sense of this). I also maybe wasn’t eating enough – but again I don’t know. Has anyone ever tried keeping a food diary for longer than a couple of days? It is very hard. Food messes with the absorption of the levodopa so balancing eating right with taking the right meds at the right time has been nigh on impossible (and exercise the right amount, and work, and raise children, and blah blah blah). What has helped has been prioritising eating well, exercising less (a small amount daily or every two days). At least I’ve managed to stop losing and I’ve even gained a small amount of weight.
2. My second challenge is handling stressful situations without complete meltdowns. I have
three children so there is a lot of crying in my household (mostly mine). What has helped has been breathing exercises to relax and not have a panic attack when things are hard. I also have invested in some home help and dialled back my work hours a bit, and I have also dialled back the self-flagellation about all the ways I’m “failing”. A bit of acceptance of my situation has helped me here. Acceptance that being present in the present with my kids is
enough.


3. Lastly (it’s a short list – I’m tired!) I have struggled with fitting in exercise around work commitments and family commitments. I love to exercise (see the above re: over training!). It makes me feel so amazing. I love the feeling of my body working, and it helps big time with pain and stiffness. It also relaxes me, chuffing out my stress. But I can easily put other stuff first and then a whole day goes by without my fix. I got some good advice to block out time
to exercise in my diary – prioritise the time and don’t let anyone or anything take it! And if all else fails and I only have 15 minutes then I prioritise dynamic stretching / yoga. Nothing feels as good as that does!

So there you have it! Life goals achieved. Time for bed.

kitty laughing into camera
Kiity Fitton - usually up to mischief.

Kitty Fitton is a motivational speaker, MC and comedian. She is also a full-time blogger and writer. She is mother to four small people and was very cross to discover she had Parkinson’s Disease.

Find out more at her personal site below. 

emma_k
Emma Kyriacou. Quite good at hitting things.

Emma Kyriacou is a real-life ninja. Taking up Karate to help fight her Parkinson’s Disease, she’s co-founder of Good Moves and is passionate about promoting exercise to improve mobility and neuroplasticity. (Is that a word? It should be.)

Find out more at her personal site below.